Sarah’s Key

Whenever I go to Target, I rarely stick to what’s on my shopping list. Regardless of what I’m there to purchase, I almost always end up walking through the book aisles. I love taking a quick look at the current best sellers and adding some of those names to my reading list or making a quick purchase on a book I’ve had my eye on. Sarah’s Key is a book I had seen on shelf at Target for as long as I can remember. I’m not entirely sure why, but I really enjoy World War II historical fiction books. One of my earliest favorite books was Number the Stars and I’ve enjoyed several other WWII books since then (my most recent favorite was The Book Thief).

Sarah's Key

Sarah’s Key

Sarah’s Key was a quick read and one that pulled me in from the very beginning. I loved how the author went between the past, telling the story of young Sarah who lived through the roundup of Jews in Paris, to the present with the story of a journalist named Julia who is trying to learn more about this historical roundup that was not conducted by the Gestapo, but by French authorities. As their stories overlapped, I couldn’t put the book down. I was impressed how the author Tatiana de Rosnay brought to life a story from this roundup through the eyes of a child, and was also saddened to think of the real children that lived through this time of history and how their lives were forever changed.

As much as I appreciated the first 2/3 of the book, I struggled with the ending. To me, it felt drawn out and like the drama was unnecessary. I had appreciated how simple the storytelling was for the first portion of the book and felt the ending was too forced in comparison. It was still overall a good book and one I would recommend, and inspired me to read another French based book – The Paris Wife. That review (along with another 10 posts I have drafted…) will be coming soon!

2 thoughts on “Sarah’s Key

  1. Pingback: Cutting for Stone | the nance familia

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